ECDOH Programs

Direct Links

Animal & Pet Health

Information for Pet Owners

Baby Think It Over

Contact information
 
Liese Ness, MS ED, Community Coalition Coordinator
95 Franklin St., Room 952 
Buffalo, NY 14202
P:(716) 858-4752
F:(716) 858-8701
Liese.Ness@erie.gov

Program Overview

Baby Think It Over is an educational loan program available to all schools and community centers to teach teenagers about the realities and responsibilities of parenting.

Through the use of electronic dolls that cry randomly both day and night, teens learn about interruptions and frustration. All "babies" look real, with heads that move and need proper support. "Babies" are available in many different nationalities. All bodies of the "babies" are anatomically correct and need proper positioning to keep "baby" happy. "Babies" need to be fed, diaper changed, burped, and rocked, and may occasionally get fussy just like a real infant. The "baby" will "coo" when it is tended to properly with gentle care. A computer records the quality of the "parenting" session, (i.e. how many times the "baby" needs specific care, and if the baby is neglected or abused.)

Once the student has parent permission through the school or community organization, an overnight or weekend "baby" loan allows the student to care for the "baby". Teens often comment that they had no idea how much work and time and energy a baby demands of their personal time. As well, upon walking the "baby" through the mall or neighborhood streets, they quickly experience the reactions of others seeing a teenager in a "parent" role so early in their life.

Dolls are loaned to the schools, community-based organizations, and churches for FREE. You can choose the ethnicities (African American, Hispanic, or Caucasian) that reflect your student population, and will receive both males and females. A Drug Affected "baby" and a Fetal Alcohol Syndrome "baby" are also available. Extensive training materials help students learn the financial commitment babies require and other topics related to caring for a baby.

"You tell them and they forget. You show them and they may remember. Involve them and they will understand." Baby Think It Over is a lesson teens won't forget.

Bats

Area Served: Erie County, NY

Contact Information:
ECDOH Building
503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
After Business Hours Emergency Contact: (716) 961-7898

Free Rabies Vaccine Clinics

Educational Materials

Board of Health (BOH)

Erie County, New York Board of Health (BOH) 

Current Members 

BOH Meeting Notice - May 6, 2014 at 3:30 in Room 904 at 95 Franklin St, Buffalo, NY 14202

Meeting Minutes

Memorandum of Support for Pharmacist Administered Vaccine

Duties and Responsibilities of the BOH

Food Policy Council of Buffalo and Erie County

Sanitary Code (Erie County)

Erie County Charter Article 5 Section 503 Board of Health

Erie County Administrative Code Article 5 Section 5.04 

Cancer Screening & Education

Contact Information

Michelle Wysocki, Program Director
Cancer Services Program of Erie County
95 Franklin St., 951
Buffalo, NY 14202
P:(716) 858-2990
F:(716) 858-7964
Michelle.Wysocki@erie.gov
 

Community Health Fairs

Contact information
 
Liese Ness, MS ED, Community Coalition Coordinator
95 Franklin St., Room 952
Buffalo, NY 14202
P:(716) 858-4752
F:(716) 858-8701
Liese.Ness@erie.gov

The Erie County Department of Health collaborates with community organizations to offer health education and screening at community events such as health fairs, neighborhood events, etc.  Health educators and prevention specialists may be available to provide screening for sexually transmitted infections (chlamydia, gonorrhea, HIV), high blood pressure, obesity, dental health, and adequate nutrition and physical education.

Please contact us about participating in your event.  Please note that priority is given to events with a large expected turnout and we may not be able to participate in all events.   

Community Wellness

Contact information
 
Liese Ness, MS ED, Community Coalition Coordinator
95 Franklin St., Room 952
Buffalo, NY 14202
P:(716) 858-4752
F:(716) 858-8701
Liese.Ness@erie.gov

Community Wellness is a subdivision of Public Health Services Division in the Erie County Department of Health.  It focuses on health awareness, health education and prevention of chronic disease for the general population. It includes the following programs and projects:

Correctional Health

Contact number: (716) 858-8688

The Division of Correctional Health insures timely and appropriate medical care for incarcerated members of our community. We provide access to medical providers, nursing care, medication and urgent treatment needs. Additionally, we serve as the referral source for mental health and dentistry.

This comprehensive 24/7 service to our community impacts public health in a positive way by providing preventative, acute and chronic care for many who have had none prior to their incarceration, and provides continuity of care for those who have.

While we are unable to discuss the protected health information of our patients we are happy to address your questions and concerns and answer them to the best of our ability. Please call the number below; we will return your call as quickly as possible.

Helpful Links

Data & Statistics

Dental Education

Lisa Milewski, Dental Hygienist
95 Franklin Street
Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone:(716) 858-6485
Fax:(716) 858-7964
Lisa.Miller-Milewski@erie.gov

A dental hygienist from the Erie County Department of Health is currently collaborating with the Buffalo Public Schools and area charter schools to provide early dental education to all 2nd graders.  Education emphasizes the importance of good dental hygiene for healthy habits lifelong.  Early education and intervention can prevent early life dental caries and other dental disease.  For more information, please call 716-858-6485.

Diabetes Prevention

Research studies have found that moderate weight loss and exercise can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes among adults at high-risk of diabetes. Find out more about the risk factors for type 2 diabetes, what it means to have prediabetes, and what you can do to prevent or delay diabetes. See also EAT RIGHT and BE ACTIVE.

Resources

Diseases & Conditions (A-Z Index)

Diseases and Conditions Index

Emergency Medical Services (EMS)

Click to go to www.nyalert.govJohn Adolf  
Deputy Commissioner/EMS
john.adolf@erie.gov
Phone: 716-681-6070
Fax: 716-681-5256
24 Hour Dispatch: 716-898-3696  

     

Under the direction of the EMS Division, MERS Control serves as the County's emergency dispatch center, dispatching ambulances for the City of Buffalo, NYS Thruway and the Buffalo Niagara International Airport (B.N.I.A.). Additionally, MERS Control coordinates the countywide ambulance-to-hospital Medical Emergency Radio System (MERS). MERS Control also acts as the after-hours answering point for the Erie County Department of Emergency Services and the Erie County Department of Health.

For more information call 716-681-6070, or send a fax to 716-681-5256.

Environmental Health

Environmental Health Division
503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone:  (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Areas Served:  All areas in Erie County, NY
For Emergencies after regular business hours: 716- 961-7898
Printable Map (PDF)

Environmental Health Public Health Sanitarians inspect for health hazards and advise on preventive measures to maintain a healthy environment.

Environmental health services include inspection of homes, schools, restaurants, children's' camps, swimming pools, beaches, septic systems, hotels/motels, rooming houses, campsites, mobile home parks, animal bites, smoking restrictions, day-care centers, tattoo parlors, and other businesses involved with food. Investigators investigate complaints concerning no water, lack of heat, improper venting, garbage, rodents and sewage.

Epidemiology & Disease Control

Erie County Department of Health
Epidemiology/Disease Control Program
95 Franklin Street, Room 978
Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone: (716) 858-7697
Fax: (716) 858-7964

Reportable Diseases & Forms

Data

Disease Control is in charge of:

Healthy Neighborhoods Program (HNP)

Healthy Neighborhoods Program
ECDOH Building
503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: 716-961-6800
Fax: 716-961-6880

For over 20 years the Healthy Neighborhoods Program has provided the residents of the City of Buffalo much needed assistance to make their homes free of environmental health and safety hazards. The program is funded by the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) and is completely FREE.

Health Inspectors/Educators visit selected neighborhoods "door to door" providing information, products and a home safety survey. In addition, safety inspections of all homes in the neighborhood are conducted to improve the quality of life in each neighborhood.

Home visits include information and a home assessment for:

Following the home assessment, intervention products & services are given to each household depending on need and interest. These products include:

Referrals are made within the ECDOH and interdepartmentally to the Department of Senior Services; as well as to other agencies such as Joan A. Male Family Support Center, the City of Buffalo Mayors Impact Team and Catholic Charities WIC. Finally, if necessary, enforcement activities are initiated and followed through to completion.   

Who Can Participate?

The Healthy Neighborhoods Program is available to anyone living in the following zip codes within the City of Buffalo: 14201, 14202, 14206, 14207, 14208, 14209, 14210, 14211, 14212, 14213 and 14215, 14218 (City of Lackawanna).  Call the ECDOH at 716-961-6800 and ask for a FREE "Healthy Neighborhoods visit".

 

HIV Partner Service Program

Erie County Department of Health HIV Partner Services Programs

Research demonstrates that prevention counseling can reduce risk for acquiring a new STD.  Effective behavioral interventions can reduce risk behaviors, and HIV positive individuals who are aware of their status have significantly lower transmission risk behaviors than those who are unaware. It has also been demonstrated that Partner Services (PS) conducted by public health professionals are effective at increasing HIV testing and identifying new cases of HIV infection.  Department of health-based notification identifies enough partners to reduce transmission and promote infection control, and more partners are treated through PS than through other strategies.

HIV Partner Services Program

The overall goal of the HIV Partner Services Program is to assist HIV infected individuals and their medical providers in identifying sexual and needle-sharing partners, including spouses and notifying them of their possible exposure to HIV and other STD’S.

Contact: 
Michael Chase
Public Health Educator
Phone: 716-858-8503
Email: michael.chase@erie.gov
 
Expanded Partner Services Program

This program will use surveillance data to identify HIV positive individuals who are not currently engaged in medical care and/or have no evidence of HIV-related lab work (CD4 or Viral Load) in the past 13-24 months. These individuals will, on average, have much higher viral loads (VL) than individuals engaged in care.  A higher VL is associated with increased HIV infectiousness.  Successful Anti Retro-Viral therapy leads to rapid VL decrease.   Thus, out-of-care individuals and those with high viral loads are important to target for enhanced PS, along with those who may be unaware of their HIV status.  A new STD in an HIV-infected person also signals the likelihood that an HIV-infected person is engaging in behaviors that expose others to HIV.  These individuals will be targeted for enhanced partner services, with the specific objectives of re-engaging them in medical care and notifying and testing/treating partners.  

Contact:
Liza Gabriel-Austin
Phone:  716-858-7653
Email:  Liza.Gabriel-Austin@erie.gov
 
 
Program Coordinator:
Rebecca Sole
Supervising Disease Intervention Specialist, Erie County Program Coordinator HIV/STD
Phone: 716-858-7683
Email: rebecca.sole@erie.gov
 
 

Immunizations

Immunization Action Plan (IAP)
608 William Street
Buffalo, NY 14206
Phone:(716) 858-2373
Fax:(716) 858-2127
Karen.Menza@erie.gov 
 

Important Links:

The Immunization Action Plan - Bee Wise….Immunize!      

Additional Links:

Inspections & Food Sanitation Services

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214 
Phone: (716) 961-6800 
Fax: (716) 961-6880 
Areas Served: All areas in Erie County, NY 
For Emergencies after regular business hours: 716- 961-7898 
Printable Map (PDF)

The Food Sanitation Services program of the Environmental Health Office maintains a food inspection program of food service establishments and caterers to protect the public's health. The office also provides health education and information on safe food handling practices. For information concerning this program, please call (716) 961-6800. 

Food Facility Inspections  NEW!

Temporary Food Stand Operator Information

To operate a temporary food stand, you must obtain an Erie County Health Permit and conform with the requirements of the State Sanitary Code for Temporary Food Service Establishments Part 14-2. Operation of a frozen dessert machine requires an additional fee of $25.

Please fill out the application and return it along with the proper fee to the address indicated at least five (5) days prior to the event to avoid an additional $40.00 late filing fee.

Your temporary stand is subject to inspection by this Department at any time during its operation to insure compliance with the State Sanitary Code.

Lead Poisoning Prevention

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Printable Map (PDF)

 

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week (October)

Lead Poisoning Prevention in Erie County

Despite substantial progress, childhood lead poisoning remains a serious problem in Erie County and New York State as a whole.  Nine of the county's zip codes - 14201, 14207, 14208, 14209, 14210, 14211, 14212, 14213, and 14215 - have been designated by the Department of Health as “Communities of Concern”, where children are at exceptionally high risk for lead poisoning. All of these zip codes lie within the City of Buffalo, but the conditions that give rise to ldead poisoning can be found anywhere. Since there is no medical treatment that permanently reverses the adverse health effects of lead exposure in children, it is critical to focus on prevention. 

Lead and Lead Poisoning

Lead is an element found naturally in the earth’s crust that has been mined and used by people for thousands of years.  It is useful in manufacturing, surface coatings and glazes, automobile batteries, and a variety of industrial processes.  Up until 1978, lead was used in many house paints, and even today, deteriorating lead-based paint in homes can lead to high concentrations of lead in house dust.

Like iron, calcium, and magnesium, lead is a metal.  However, unlike those minerals, which are needed by the human body, lead is a poison – even in very small amounts.  It can cause learning disabilities, behavioral problems, and, at very high levels, seizures, coma, and even death.  Young children, when exposed to high levels of lead in house dust, are particularly vulnerable.

In order to prevent children in your home or apartment from suffering the damaging effects of lead poisoning, it is necessary to keep the home clean and keep painted surfaces intact.

The Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) offers the following programs that support the elimination of lead poisoning:

For more information about these programs, or for general information on how to help prevent lead poisoning, contact the ECDOH Environmental Health Division at 716-961-6800.

For more Information on lead poisoning visit the following web sites:

Are you performing any renovations on your property or hiring a contractor?

Under strict new EPA rules that took effect on April 22, 2010, special certification is required for all home improvement activity in housing built before 1978 and in ANY child occupied facility. The new rule called "Renovating, Repairing and Painting (RRP)" is intended to ensure that any activity that disturbs paint in older housing is performed using lead-safe work practices.

Contractors who perform renovation, repairs, and painting as part of their jobs now need to have this certification and must take special precautions around paint that may contain lead. Be sure to ask your contractor about their certification(s).

For more information visit the EPA "RRP" website or call 1-800-424-LEAD (5323).

Locations

95 Franklin Street
Buffalo, NY 14202
716-858-7690
Administration, Chronic Disease Prevention, Epidemiology & Surveillance, Public Health Emergency Preparedness, Special Needs 
 
 
608 William Street
Buffalo NY 14206
716-858-7687
STDTB, Immunizations
 
 
501 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo NY 14214
716-961-7591
Medical Examiners
 
 
503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo NY 14214
716-961-6800
Public Health Laboratories & Environmental Health Programs

Maternal and Child Health

Local Resources

Other Helpful Resources:

Medical Examiner's Office

Program Description

Types of Deaths Reportable

Organ, Tissue and Eye Donation

Autopsy Report Requests

Gale R. Burstein, MD, MPH, FAAP, Commissioner of Health

Janinne Blank, MBA, RN, Director, Division of Medical Examiner

Tara J. Mahar, MD, Chief Medical Examiner

Katherine F. Maloney, MD, Associate Chief Medical Examiner

Nicole A. Yarid, MD, Associate Chief Medical Examiner

 
501 Kensington Ave.
 Buffalo, NY 14214
 Telephone: 716.961.7591
 Fax: 716.961.7581 
 Map

 

MISSION STATEMENT 

It is the mission of the Erie County Medical Examiner’s Office to serve the public in a professional, confidential and courteous manner in the medico-legal investigation of deaths in western NY counties, thereby enhancing our understanding of death and dying.  Our objectives are to work diligently to determine the cause and manner of death of our constituents, and to convey those findings in a timely fashion to families and to such agencies in the health and legal communities that have ongoing concerns related to the deceased and their survivors.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 

The Office of the Medical Examiner is organized into three sections under the Department of Health:  

As mandated by law, the Office of the Medical Examiner is responsible for investigating the death of any person who dies within Erie County as a result of criminal violence, neglect, casualty, suicide, or in any suspicious or unusual manner. Other cases investigated include those involving individuals who die suddenly when in apparent health or those unattended by a physician. The office also investigates deaths occurring while a person is confined in a public institution other than a hospital, infirmary or nursing home.  Manners of death are classified as natural, accidental, homicide, suicide, or undetermined.   

The histology laboratory and the forensic toxicology laboratory within the Medical Examiner’s Office provide specialized laboratory services in death and DUI drug facilitated sexual assault investigations.   

It is the responsibility of the office to generate death certificates as to cause and manner of death.  The office also participates in the training programs for SUNY at Buffalo Medical School resident doctors and third and fourth year medical students; SUNY at Buffalo fourth year dental school students; Buffalo State Forensic Chemistry students; Hilbert College Forensic Science and Criminal Justice students; SUNY at Buffalo Anthropology students; and EMT students.  Revenue enhancing activities are derived through contractual agreements with Niagara, Chautauqua and Cattaraugus Counties for forensic autopsy services, and Chautauqua, Cattaraugus and Jefferson Counties for forensic toxicology assistance.  

TYPES OF DEATHS REPORTABL

The Office of the Medical Examiner (ECMEO) has jurisdiction over deaths occurring under the following circumstances: 

ORGAN, TISSUE AND EYE DONATION

The Erie County Medical Examiner’s Office works collaboratively with Upstate New York Transplant Services in order to honor the families’ wishes regarding the authorization for donation of organs, tissues and eyes while maintaining the integrity of their medico legal responsibilities. It is with rare exception that the procurement of organs, tissues and eyes is denied by the Erie County Medical Examiner’s office.  For further information contact UNYTS at 716-853-6667 ext. 5.

AUTOPSY REPORT REQUESTS 

The information contained within an autopsy report is confidential and treated as a medical record.  The final report is available at no charge to the immediate and legal next of kin (spouse, adult child, parent, adult sibling or grandparent) by clicking on the Request for Autopsy Report Form.    

If there is a request for a copy of the report from someone other than those legally entitled (e.g. insurance company or private attorney), the request must be submitted on their letterhead and include a HIPPA form signed by the legal next of kin.  Also included should be a $38.50 check made payable to the Erie County Medical Examiner’s Office. 

Autopsy results and reports will not be given out until the case file is complete.  If the death was suspicious or the autopsy report contains sensitive material that could jeopardize a criminal investigation, there may be a delay before it is released.

Needle Access and Disposal & Medication Disposal

Liese Ness, MS ED, Community Coalition Coordinator
95 Franklin St., Room 952
Buffalo, NY 14202
Phone:(716) 858-4752
Fax:(716) 858-8701
Liese.Ness@erie.gov
 
Safely Dispose of Needles, Syringes and Lancets and Unused, Unneeded and Unwanted Medications

Needle Access & Disposal: Through the Erie County SEAD (Syringe Expanded Access and Disposal) Project the Erie County Department of Health, along with representatives from the fields of Diabetes, HIV/AIDS, business, sanitation, law enforcement, pharmacy, spiritual, government, medicine and lay persons created a partnership to safely dispose of used needles, syringes & lancets free of charge. Disposal is now very convenient to county residents through the establishment of kiosk disposal sites in many Kmart pharmacies, health department clinic sites, Community Based Organizations and Diabetes Specialty Centers.

On January 1, 2000 the NY State Legislature instituted the Public Health Law Syringe Access Demonstration Program (ESAP) which decriminalized the selling/furnishing and possession of syringes without a physician's prescription. The Erie County Department of Health is a distribution site for limited free medical supplies such as syringes, band aids, cotton, alcohol wipes, etc. for Erie County residents.  For more Information, please contact Liese Ness at (716) 858-4752.

Medication Disposal: If not disposed of properly, prescription and over-the-counter medications pose a hazard to our environment and risk getting into the hands of children or others who may be unintentionally harmed by their use.

Residents are encouraged to go through their medicine cabinets, closets, junk drawers, etc. and gather unused, expired and unwanted prescription and over-the-counter medications.  Click on the link above to find a site where medications can be disposed of free of charge with no questions asked. 

Help create a safer and healthier community by properly disposing used needles, syringes, lancets and medications.  Thank you.

Nutrition

Local Resources

Cookbooks/Recipes

Additional Resources

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Construction/Repair and Property Transfer Information

Residential New Construction:

As of July 1, 2012, if you are in the process of constructing a new home in Erie County that needs to have an onsite wastewater treatment system (OWTS), then you must hire a licensed design professional (i.e. a licensed professional engineer, a registered architect, or a licensed land surveyor with an exemption certificate (Section 7208n of New York State Education Law)) to design the appropriate system to serve your residence.  The design professional will create an engineer’s report and plans that must be submitted to the Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) along with an Application for a Construction Permit for an Onsite Wastewater Treatment System for Residential or Commercial Lots Prepared by a Design Professional and a $300 fee.  Click here for a list of licensed engineers (a complete list can be found in the phone book). 

Once the application, fee, engineer’s report and plans are received, the project will be reviewed by Erie County Department of Health staff to determine if the plan meets Health Department regulations.  Once it is determined that the plans meet Health Department regulations, the Department will issue a construction permit.  Click here for design guidelines and requirements

If your home is required to have a well installed in order to supply potable water it must be installed by a NYS Department of Environmental Conservation certified well driller.  The well driller must supply you with a well log detailing the installation of the well.  Once the well has been installed and properly disinfected (see Drinking Water information web page for more information) then the Erie County Department of Health must be contacted at 961-6800 to schedule a time for our representative to collect a sample and have it analyzed for bacteria (coliform/E.coli) at the Erie County Public Health Laboratory.  A copy of the well log must be given to your design professional.

If the result of your water sample is positive for total coliform or E.coli then it is recommended that you re-disinfect your well and contact the Erie County Department of Health to resample.  If the second sample is also positive for total coliform or E.coli then you must have an appropriate disinfection system installed on your water system (Click here for well disinfection procedures).  The Erie County Department of Health will inspect the installation of a disinfection system and collect another sample to have analyzed for bacteria.  This must be completed prior to a Completed Works Approval being issued for the Onsite Wastewater Treatment System.

New Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Installation:

You are responsible for hiring a contractor to construct your onsite wastewater treatment system per the Erie County Department of Health approved specifications designed by the design professional you hired.  During the construction of your septic system, your design professional will complete one or more inspections to ensure that the system being installed meets the specifications issued.  Based on the inspection(s), the engineer will issue a construction compliance stating that the system was installed per plans.  The construction certification must be submitted to the ECDOH prior to a Completed Works Approval being issued.

A Completed Works Approval will be issued after your design professional submits a construction compliance form to this Department stating the system was installed properly.  If your home is served by a well, then a copy of the well log from a licensed well driller, a bacteria sample result, and documentation of a disinfection system installation (if needed)  must also be submitted.

Residential Repair/Replacement:

If your current onsite wastewater treatment system is in need of repair or if your system is in failure and in need of replacement, you must submit an application and $300 fee to the ECDOH.  Once we receive your application and fee, we will make an assessment as to the degree of failure and the required repairs or replacement.  If your system must be replaced the ECDOH will issue specifications for a new septic system.

If your property includes an existing or proposed private well the location must be included with the application.  The sanitarian will complete an inspection of your well during inspection of the construction of the septic system for your property.  The inspection includes determining if your well and onsite wastewater treatment system meet the proper separation distances, construction requirements, and a water sample to ensure that the well meets bacteriological requirements.  The property survey that must be submitted with your application must include the existing or proposed well location.  Prior to this inspection, it is recommended that you disinfect your well (Click here for well disinfection procedures). 

Onsite Wastewater Treatment System Installation:

You are responsible for hiring a contractor to construct your onsite wastewater treatment system per the specifications issued by the ECDOH.  During the construction of your onsite wastewater treatment system, a public health sanitarian will complete one or more inspections to ensure that the system being installed meets the specifications issued.  A Certificate of Construction Compliance will be issued when construction is satisfactorily completed.

Difficult Sites for Repair or Replacement:

If your property contains multiple constraints for construction, (i.e. creeks, ravines, extreme slope, lack of drainage, etc.), you may be required to hire a design professional to design an onsite wastewater treatment system for your lot.  In this case, once your engineer has designed a septic system for your property, you must submit the plans to the ECDOH with an Application for a Construction Permit for an Onsite Wastewater Treatment System for Residential or Commercial Lots Prepared by a Design Professional and a $300 fee for review and approval.  If an application and fee were previously submitted to this Department to issue the design for your property, an additional application and fee will not be required.  Click here for a list of design professionals (a complete list can be found in the phone book).

You are responsible for hiring a contractor to construct your onsite wastewater treatment system per the Erie County Department of Health approved specifications designed by the design professional you hired.  During the construction of your septic system, your design professional will complete one or more inspections to ensure that the system being installed meets the specifications issued.  Based on the inspection(s), the engineer will issue a construction compliance stating that the system was installed per plans.  The construction certification must be submitted to the ECDOH prior to a Completed Works Approval being issued.

A Completed Works Approval will be issued after your design professional submits a construction compliance form to this Department stating the system was installed properly.  If your home is served by a well, then a copy of the well log from a licensed well driller, a bacteria sample result, and documentation of a disinfection system installation (if needed)  must also be submitted.

Commercial:

All commercial facilities must have a design professional prepare plans for the onsite wastewater treatment system required for the property.  Click here for design guidelines and requirements 

The design plans must be submitted to the ECDOH with the required Application for a Construction Permit for an Onsite Wastewater Treatment System for Residential or Commercial Lots Prepared by a Design Professional and $300 fee for review and approval.  Your design professional is required to complete one or more inspections of the onsite wastewater treatment system as it is being constructed.  Based on the inspection(s), the design professional will issue a construction compliance stating that the system was installed per plans.  The construction compliance must be submitted to the ECDOH prior to a Completed Works Approval being issued.

Property Transfers

In Erie County you are required to have your onsite wastewater treatment system dye tested and your well tested for bacteriological quality prior to any property transfer.  The seller of the property must submit an application and appropriate fee for a property transfer.  If the dye test and bacteriological tests are negative you will receive a property transfer certification.  Please note it may take up to 45 days to complete the property transfer inspection process. 

Please be advised that proper inspection of an onsite wastewater treatment system requires that the ground surrounding the system be free of cover or debris in order to properly conduct the necessary testing.  Therefore, once snow cover or frozen ground occurs the ECDOH will suspend dye tests for the winter months.  Dye tests will resume when temperatures are above freezing and snow cover is absent. 

For the property transfer inspection a responsible person, over 18 years of age, must be at the residence.  Property transfer inspections typically take 3 days and you can expect our staff to be at your residence for approximately 1 ½ hours on each day.  Access to the interior of the home is necessary for our staff to perform a plumbing inspection and to introduce dye into the system.

To test the onsite wastewater treatment system, yellow-green tracing dye is introduced into the system.  Prior to the ECDOH inspection, please assure that all wastewater lines (including laundry and utility sink discharges) are connected to the sewage disposal system.  The area of the sewage disposal system must be free of tall grass, weeds and debris or other cover.  Do not pump the septic tank prior to the ECDOH inspection.  A system is in failure if sewage/dye is exposed to the atmosphere or on the ground surface.

If the onsite wastewater treatment system on your property fails, a replacement system must be designed, as described above, for your property by the ECDOH.  An additional application and $300 fee will be required.  The replacement system must be constructed prior to the ECDOH issuing a property transfer certification.  If you know your onsite wastewater treatment system is in failure prior to the property transfer you may submit a new system construction application with your property transfer application.  You will only be required to pay for the property transfer.

For the private water supply portion of the property transfer, the structure and location of the water supply is inspected and the water is tested for bacteriological quality.  Please note, if there is an existing disinfection system (i.e.: chlorination or an ultra-violet light unit) it must be operating at the time of inspection.

If your home is served by an excavated (dug) well you will be required to either install a filtration and disinfection system or abandon the well and install a new drilled well prior to issuance of a property transfer certification.

If your property has a drinking water well and the water does not meet required bacteriological quality you will be required to disinfect your well by installing either a chlorine injection system or an ultra-violet light disinfection system.  Once installation is complete your water must be tested again prior to being issued a property transfer certification.

A property transfer certification is valid for six months from the date the certification is issued.  Once the certification expires another application and fee must be submitted so that another dye test and bacteriological sample (if required) can be completed. 

Additional Sampling

For those who are required by their mortgage lenders to have additional sampling of their water supplies beyond Total Coliform/E. Coli testing, the Erie County Department of Health will be offering to collect samples for lead, nitrate, and nitrite at the time of property transfer inspection.  The samples will be delivered to the Erie County Public Health Laboratory (ECPHL) for analysis.  The ECPHL will bill the homeowner for the cost of the analysis.  Results will be mailed to the homeowner once payment is received.  The property transfer certification will not be contingent on the results of these additional samples.  As in the past, only the Total Coliform/E.Coli results will be considered relative to the property transfer certification.

Property Transfer Waivers

If the anticipated closing date of the property transfer is scheduled before an inspection can be performed, the home has been vacant for longer than 90 days, the home is vacant and has an unmetered water supply, or if additional time is needed for corrections to the existing onsite wastewater treatment system or water supply, a Waiver of Property Transfer Certification will be required to close on the property.  The Waiver of Property Transfer Certification application must be completed by the purchaser and submitted with a $1,000.00 check or money order made payable to the Erie County Department of Health.  The $1,000 waiver fee will be returned to the purchaser at the address listed on the application once the property transfer certification has been issued.  By applying for a waiver, the purchaser agrees to allow for an inspection of the sewage disposal and/or water systems and to assure that all necessary corrections will be made.

Peer Navigators

Antonio Estrada
Antonio.Estrada@erie.gov

Peer navigation is provided for individuals at risk or positive for HIV/AIDS.  Linkage to appropriate services and case management is provided for clients identified in the community through HIV testing and education/outreach events.  Potential clients may call (716) 858-7629 for assistance.

Permits and Applications

Physical Activity

Contact information
 
Liese Ness, MS ED, Community Coalition Coordinator
95 Franklin St., Room 952
Buffalo, NY 14202
P:(716) 858-4752
F:(716) 858-8701
Liese.Ness@erie.gov

Guided Walks in Erie County Parks

The Erie County Departments of Health, Parks &  Recreation, and Senior Services have teamed up with the Wellness Institute of Greater Buffalo to offer healthy family fun throughout the Erie County Parks system.  Each Spring and Fall, people of all ages and abilities are invited to join us for a 6-week series of guided walks through beautiful Erie County parks. 

Each Saturday morning walk begins at 9:00 am at a different park each week during the 6-week session.  Walkers are invited to come to any or all of the walks.

At these walks, you will have the opportunity to learn valuable health information, and to participate in health screenings such as blood pressure and Body Mass Index (BMI).

Senior Services programs, health screenings, health education materials and smoking cessation services, products and program enrollment are available at each walk.

Let’s Be Active Erie County! 

Helpful Links

Public Health Emergency Preparedness

Storm Info and Preparedness Materials

Contact Information:

Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness
95 Franklin Street, Room 931
Buffalo, New York 14202
Phone: 716-858-7101
Fax: 716-858-7121

The Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness (OPHEP) is responsible for leading the Erie County Department of Health to effectively prepare for, respond to, and recover from a public health emergency caused by a natural or manmade disaster.  The Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness is located in the Division of Emergency Medical Services and works closely with Emergency Services, other County Departments, Health Care Partners and community agencies to:

Integrated Shelter Support:  In the event general population shelters are established in Erie County, the Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness will work with the American Red Cross, Buffalo Chapter to coordinate public health services, basic medical care, and functional needs support services.  Examples of services provided include:

Isolation and Quarantine:  In a public health emergency caused by an infectious disease the Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness will coordinate activities that will stop or limit the spread of disease.

Mass Fatality: In a public health emergency that exceeds the community’s ability to manage human fatalities, the Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness will coordinate with the Erie County Medical Examiner’s Office and other community partners to effectively respond.

Mass Vaccination and Mass Prophylaxis:  Some public health emergencies may require administration of large numbers of vaccine or medication in a short period of time.  The Office of Public Health Emergency Preparedness will coordinate the Erie County Department of Health’s response which may include Points of Dispensing.  Points of Dispensing (POD) sites are typically large facilities (universities, colleges, high schools) located throughout the County. Depending on the nature of the medical emergency PODs may have to operate 24 hours a day for several days.  Erie County Department of Health has agreements with many locations throughout the County to operate POD’s in the event of an emergency.

Medical Surge: Medical Surge is the capability to rapidly expand the capacity of the existing healthcare system (long-term care facilities, community health agencies, acute care facilities, alternate care facilities and public health departments) in order to provide assessment and subsequent medical care.

Strategic National Stockpile Plan: The federal Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) has large quantities of medicine and medical supplies to protect the American public if there is a public health emergency severe enough to cause local supplies to run out. Once federal and local authorities agree that the SNS is needed, medicines will be delivered to any state in the U.S. within 12 hours. Each state has plans to receive and distribute SNS medicine and medical supplies to local communities as quickly as possible.

Erie County is prepared to receive process and distribute medication, supplies and equipment to Points of Distribution (POD) sites and hospitals throughout the County. 

This website contains critical emergency-related information including instructions and recommended protective actions developed in real-time by emergency service personnel. Concurrent with the posting to this website, that same information will be disseminated through various communications systems (e.g. email, cell phones, and media outlets) to those who sign up.

The information posted here will include severe weather warnings, significant highway closures, hazardous materials spills, and many other emergency conditions. Additionally you will find information regarding response actions being taken by local and state agencies and protective actions that you should take to protect you, your family and your property.

Public Health Engineering

Environmental Health Division
503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Printable Map (PDF)

The Public Health Engineering division is responsible for the regulation of public water supplies and all residential or small commercial private wastewater treatment facilities and for the review and approval of plans for new or replacement water lines, sanitary sewers, private wastewater treatment systems, public swimming pools and realty subdivisions.

Information for Design Professionals

Drinking (Potable) Water

General Information 

Consumers of Publicly Supplied Water 

Erie County Department of Health is responsible for overseeing and regulating public drinking water supplies’ compliance with State and Federal standards.  All public water supplies are required to test for a variety of contaminants.  This testing information must be reported to all customers in the water system’s Annual Water Quality Report.  Many municipalities and water companies put copies of their Annual Water Quality Reports on their websites.  If the Annual Water Quality Report is not available on the water system’s website you should call your water system and ask for a copy.  Also, the Erie County Department of Health retains copies of all Annual Water Quality Reports; if you cannot get a copy of the report from your water system please contact us at 716-961-6800. 

Private Water Supplies (wells)

In order to assist in protecting private water supplies, the Erie County Department of Health:

During a property transfer or new home construction with a private sewage disposal system a sanitary survey of the well is completed that includes a visual inspection of the well casing, well cap, and the area surrounding the well for any potential sources of contamination that includes adequate separation from the sewage disposal system.  If the well casing or cap are in poor condition repairs will be required prior to issuing a property transfer certification. If separation distances are inadequate the well location may be required to be moved.   If potential sources of contamination are present the owner will be required to remediate the source of contamination prior to being issued a property transfer certification.  If your home is served by an excavated (dug) well you will be required to either install a filtration and disinfection system or abandon the well and install a new drilled well prior to issuance of a property transfer certification.  Also, a bacteriological sample is taken to ensure the quality of the water is acceptable.  If coliform bacteria are found to be present the homeowner will be required to disinfect the water supply and a resample and retest will be conducted.  If coliform bacteria are found in the resample the homeowner will be required to install permanent disinfection or retain a certified well driller to remediate the source of contamination.

Note:  Individuals who suspect their water may be contaminated by disease-producing fecal contaminants should boil water (see “How do I boil water to make it safe to drink?” in FAQ section below) before use for drinking, food preparation, brushing teeth and washing dishes or use bottled water and have their water tested for coliform bacteria by a New York State Department of Health-certified environmental laboratory.   If individuals suspect their water may be contaminated by other pollutants, such as herbicides, pesticides or chemicals, the water should not be used for any of the above purposes until it is verified to be safe (see “What should I have my well tested for?” in FAQ section below). 

Frequently Asked Questions:

Q: How do I boil water to make it safe to drink?

A: Bring all water to a rolling boil, let it boil for one minute, and let it cool before using.  Once water has been boiled it can be stored in a sanitized container in the refrigerator for several days.  It should be noted that all water used for drinking, food preparation, brushing teeth and washing dishes should be boiled prior to use if your water has bacteria present.

Q: Why should I hire a NYSDEC certified well driller to install my new well?

A: Since January of 2000, NYS Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) Law requires that "No person shall engage in the business of water well drilling in the state of New York without first obtaining a certificate of registration from the Department". Registration is required where drilling activity includes "construction and reconstruction of water wells, the establishment or repair of a connection through the well casing and the repair of water wells including repairs which require the opening of the well casing". This means that contractors who perform water well drilling or service activities must register and comply with all applicable laws, rules and regulations.

If you are planning to hire a water well contractor, NYS law has established specific requirements to benefit you the consumer. These include:

Q: How far should my well be from a private sewage disposal system or other potential sources of contaminates?

A: Your well should be located at least 50 feet from your septic tank and any neighboring septic tanks.  In general, if your well is greater than 50 feet deep and is not located in coarse gravel, then your well should be at least 100 feet from the leaching area or sand filter of your and your neighbor’s private sewage disposal systems. This is a general guideline, however specific local conditions sometimes necessitate increased separation distances. Where the well is less than 50 feet deep, or located in coarse gravel, or seepage pits are used in the area for sewage disposal or other sources of contamination are present (such as agricultural uses) contact the Health Department at 961-6800 for additional information in regards to separation distances.

Q: Why would a private well need to be disinfected?

A: Safe drinking water must be free of harmful disease-producing organisms.  These organisms can cause illnesses such as giardiasis, dysentery, and gastroenteritis.  When there is damage to a well or the well has been flooded, disease causing organisms can flow into the well water.  The purpose of disinfection is to kill or inactivate disease causing organisms that may be present.

Q: What should I have my well water tested for and how often?

A: It is recommended that you have your well water tested at least annually for total coliform bacteria and nitrate.  If a new baby is expected in the household it is a good idea to test for nitrate and total coliform bacteria in the early months of pregnancy, before bringing an infant home, and again during the first 6 months of the baby’s life.  It is important to test for nitrate when infants under 6 months of age are in the household since high levels of nitrates can cause serious illness in infants. 

The chart below lists some other reasons for having your water tested and suggestions on what to test. 

Conditions or Nearby Activities

What to Test for

Recurring gastrointestinal illness

Coliform bacteria

Household plumbing contains lead

Lead and Copper

Nearby areas of intensive agriculture

Nitrate, coliform bacteria, pesticides

Gas drilling operations nearby

Chloride, Sodium, Barium, Strontium

Odor of gasoline or fuel oil, near gas station or buried fuel tanks, recent fuel spill on or near property

Volatile organic compounds

Salty taste or near a salt storage facility

Chloride, Sodium

Q: How do I get my well water tested?

A: You may contact any New York State Department of Health-certified environmental laboratory to have your water tested.  For a list of certified laboratories in New York State, see http://www.wadsworth.org/labcert/elap/comm.html which includes the Erie County Public Health Laboratory.  You may contact the Erie County Public Health Laboratory at 716-898-6100.

Most laboratories mail back the sample results within a week or two (some tests may take longer).  If a contaminant is detected, the results will include the concentration found and an indication of whether this level exceeds a drinking water health standard.  If you would like assistance in interpreting the results of your water samples please contact the Erie County Department of Health  at 716-961-6800 If a standard is exceeded in your sample, retest the water supply immediately. You may contact the Erie County Department of Health for assistance with what actions to take at 716-961-6800. 

Q: What should I do if tests indicate coliform bacteria are present in my well water?

A: The presence of coliform bacteria in your water indicates the potential for human fecal contamination.  First disinfect your well (see “How do I disinfect a well” in FAQ section below) per the directions below.  Once disinfection is complete resample the water for total coliform.  If the repeat sample is positive for coliform bacteria it is recommended that you install permanent disinfection on your water system or hire a certified well driller to locate and remediate the source of the problem.

Q: How do I disinfect a well?

A: Well disinfection can be conducted by a New York State Department of Environmental Conservation certified well driller.  If you decide to disinfect your well, you should follow the procedure below carefully.

1.  Mix two quarts of chlorine bleach (containing at least 5.25% sodium hypochlorite - see label on bottle), such as Clorox™* in ten gallons of water.

2.  Pour the solution into the well or spring, then turn the power to the pump off.  Once the chlorine solution has been poured into the well the following items are recommended:

  1. If you have a steel pressure tank:

            i. Drain all the water from the pressure tank by opening the drain valve found at the pressure tank “tee” fitting.  Turn the power to the pump back on and refill the tank with the highly chlorinated water from the well.  Bleed all the air out of the top of the tank (open the valve or remove the plug), so that the entire tank is filled with the chlorine solution.  When the entire pressure tank is filled with chlorine solution, shut off the pump and reseal the tank. 

          ii. Allow the well or spring to stand idle for at least six hours (preferably twelve to twenty-four hours).  Then pump it to waste away from grass and shrubbery.  This should be done through a hose attached to a hose bib.  NEVER FLUSH THE CHLORINE SOLUTION FROM THE WELL INTO THE SEPTIC SYSTEM.

           iii. After the well disinfection procedure is finished and the chlorine solution has been flushed from the well, turn off the power to the pump, and drain the chlorine from the pressure tank as per the instructions above.  Turn the pump back on and refill the pressure tank with fresh clean water from the well.  This will restore the 50% air to water volume you need.

  1. IF you have a bladder pressure tank:

            i. Drain all the water from the pressure tank by opening the drain valve found at the pressure tank “tee” fitting.  Turn the power to the pump back on and refill the tank with highly chlorinated water from the well.

            ii. After you are finished and the chlorine has been flushed from the well, turn off the power to the pump and drain the tank as per the instructions above.  Turn the power back on and let the tank fill up to the normal pressure.

  1. Bypass all water treatment units.

             i. Cartridge filter:  Remove the filter cartridge and put the unit back together and disinfect the housing.  Replace the cartridge with a new one once the chlorine has been flushed from the system.

            ii. Water Softeners:  Disinfect the water softener either just before or immediately after the water system has been disinfected.  To disinfect the softener add ¼ to ½ cup of bleach (containing at least 5.25% sodium hypochlorite – see bottle label) to the small fill tube in the large brine tank and do a manual recharge (if you are unsure how to do this, please contact your water treatment equipment supplier).

  1. Hot water tanks:

             i. While the power to the pump is off and you are draining the pressure tank, if you can, turn off the heater and drain and flush the sediment from the hot water tank.

             ii. Bring the highly chlorinated water from the well into the water heater.

             iii. After the chlorine has been flushed from the well and while you are draining the pressure tank, turn off and drain the chlorine solution from the hot water tank.  Refill the water heater with fresh water and turn it back on.

3.  Mix two more quarts of bleach (containing at least 5.25% sodium hypochlorite – see bottle label) in ten gallons of water and pour this chlorine solution into the well or spring.

4.  Pour the solution into the well or spring while it is being pumped.  Keep pumping until chlorine odor appears at all taps.  Then close the taps and stop the pump. 

5.  Allow the water system to stand idle for at least six hours (preferably twelve to twenty-four hours).  Then flush the system to waste, away from grass and shrubbery.  Flush through a hose attached to an outdoor hose bib until the chlorine odor is no longer detectable.  NEVER FLUSH THE CHLORINE SOLUTION FROM THE WELL INTO THE SEPTIC SYSTEM.  After flushing from a hose bib, you should then flush the remaining taps in the house until the chlorine odor is no longer detectable.

*Clorox™ and other bleaches containing 5.25% available chlorine (sodium hypochlorite) can be purchased in most drug stores, grocery stores and supermarkets.

NOTE: This procedure is to remove bacteriological contamination in the well casing and/or piping in the house; the disinfection procedure is no assurance that the water entering the well or spring is free of pollution.

If further information is needed, please call the Erie County Department of Health at (716) 961-6800.

Providers of Publicly Supplied Water:

Additional information can be found on the following websites:

Public Health Laboratory

Erie County Public Health Laboratory
503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, New York 14214
Phone: (716) 898-6100
Fax: (716) 898-6110
ecphl@erie.gov
Driving Directions to ECPHL

 

Service to the Community

The Erie County Public Health (ECPHL) Laboratories has served the residents of Western New York for over six decades.

ECPHL serves as the primary provider of laboratory testing for the Erie County Health Department's and other local health department's public health and environmental activities.

ECPHL provides rapid test result turn-around time and offers a competitive fee schedule. Customized testing is negotiable.

ECPHL staff are available for consultation.

Description of Services

ECPHL provides public health and environmental laboratory services to local health departments, hospitals, medical care providers, managed care organizations, and residents throughout Western New York. Current New York State clinical laboratory permits exist for the following disciplines:

  • General Bacteriology
  • Clinical Chemistry
  • Diagnostic Immunology
  • HIV Diagnostic Testing
  • Mycology
  • Parasitology
  • Blood Lead Toxicology
  • Urinalysis
  • Urine Pregnancy Testing

Current New York State environmental laboratory permits exist for the following disciplines:

  • Environmental Analysis/Potable Water
  • Environmental Analysis/Non-potable Water
  • Environmental Analysis/Solid and Hazardous Waste

Additionally, the laboratory is registered by the Federal Department of Health & Human Services as a CLIA registered laboratory and maintains status as a Reference laboratory in the CDC and NYSDOH coordinated Laboratory Response Network for Bioterrorism.

Mission Statement
To provide proficient, cost-effective laboratory services, educational programs, method evaluations, epidemiological support and scientific study resources to the health care, laboratory, environmental sciences, government, and private communities of Western New York.
24 October 1997

Erie County Department of Health HIPAA Information
This notice describes how medical information about you may be used and disclosed and how you can get access to this information. Please review it carefully.

Rabies, Disease & Vector Control Program

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Areas Served: All areas in Erie County, NY
For Emergencies after regular business hours: 716- 961-7898
Printable Map (PDF)

The Rabies, Disease & Vector Control Program is responsible for Rabies Prevention, Rodent Control & Arbovirus Control through enforcement and nuisance complaint response, & Neighbor Notification Law through enforcement and education and other disease prevention activities.

Mission Statement:  “Control of vector species to minimize the transmission of disease and improve the quality of life for county residents and their pets. This is achieved through public education, surveillance tools, and enforcement of public health laws and control techniques.”

Additional Information     

Rats

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Areas Served: All areas in Erie County, NY
For Emergencies after regular business hours: 716- 961-7898
Printable Map (PDF)
 

 

SMART (Specialized Medical Assistance Response Team)

Specialized Medical Assistance Response Team (SMART)

Sanitary Code (Erie County)

The erie County Sanitary Code consists of laws enforced by the Erie County Board of Health and the Erie County Department of Health to assure the health of Erie County residents and visitors.

Sanitary Code for Erie County (PDF)

Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Clinic & Info

Did you attend the ECDOH STD Clinic? If yes, please complete out patient survey! Click here!

Erie County Department of Health (ECDOH) STD Clinic
608 William Street
Buffalo NY 14206
(716) 858-7687

Hours: Monday through Thursday from 8:30 am to 11:30 am and from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm; Fridays from 10:00 am to 11:30 am and from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm.

Walk-in only - No appointments are taken.  Patients are seen on a first come, first serve basis.  We have a limited number of openings each day for patients.  Once these openings are filled, you will not be seen that day.  We suggest you arrive early. 

Picture ID, proof of insurance (no one is denied care based on ability to pay) and a list of all medications and dosages you are currently taking are needed when you come to the STD clinic.

All STD testing and treatment is confidential.  No one is denied testing or treatment based on their ability to pay.  Anyone 12 years of age and older can utilize the STD clinic.

Testing is provided for HIV, gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia, bacterial vaginosis, trichomoniasis, genital herpes, pubic lice, scabies and other STD's. Treatment for certain diagnoses is provided.  The clinic also provides HIV counseling and testing, educational presentations to community groups, and educational material on sexually transmitted diseases.

For internship info click here.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

HIV Partner Service Program

The overall goal of the HIV Partner Services Program is to assist HIV infected individuals and their medical providers in identifying sexual and needle-sharing partners, including spouses and notifying them of their possible exposure to HIV and other STD’S.

Contact
Rebecca Sole
Supervising Disease Intervention Specialist, Erie County Program Coordinator HIV/STD
Phone: 716-858-7683
Email: rebecca.sole@erie.gov
 

_____________________________________________________________________________________

STD Facts & Information

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Helpful links:

Smoking & Tobacco

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Areas Served: All areas in Erie County, NY
Printable Map (PDF)
 

Special Needs/Early Intervention Program

Offices & Services

Special Needs

Substance Abuse

PowerPoint Presentations

Opiate Overdose Prevention Program Policy & Procedures Examples

Press Release

Local Resources

Other Resources

Tattoos & Permanent Make-Up

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Areas Served: All areas in Erie County, NY
Printable Map (PDF)

Tattoos are permanent designs, pictures or other markings made on the skin by pricking the skin and staining it with an indelible ink.

Permanent Make-up is a form of tattooing that is also known as micro pigmentation. It is often used as a replacement for traditional temporary make-up, as a means of simulating natural pigmentation following reconstructive surgery or certain medical conditions, or to enhance thin or missing eyebrows.

Regulation of Tattoo/Permanent Make-Up Artists and Shops in Erie County, NY

Article XXII of the Erie County Sanitary Code requires all tattoo artists and shops operating within Erie County to obtain a permit from the Erie County Department of Health. Section XXII also establishes minimum sanitary standards for tattoo artists and shops operating within the County.

The minimum age to obtain a tattoo in Erie County is 18 years of age and the individual must show a valid government issued ID. Minors under the age of 18 are prohibited from receiving a tattoo. It is a misdemeanor under NYS Penal Law Section 260 for anyone to apply a tattoo to a person under the age of 18, with or without parental consent.

How to apply to open a tattoo shop in Erie County, NY:

NOTE: Tattoo shops may only operate at fixed locations, and are not allowed in private residences.  No mobile tattoo shops or shops operating at temporary locations are permitted at this time.

1.  Submit the following items to the ECDOH, 503 Kensington Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14214

2. Familiarize yourself with Article XXII of the Erie County Sanitary Code.

3. Check with your local municipality regarding appropriate zoning laws and other required municipal licenses and permits.

How to apply to operate as a Tattoo Artist in Erie County:

NOTE: Tattoo artists may only perform tattooing in a tattoo shop currently under permit with the ECDOH.

Tattooing in private homes or other locations is prohibited. Artists must hold a separate artist certificate for each shop where they perform tattooing.  Artist certificates are non-transferable between shops.

1.  Submit the following items to the ECDOH, 503 Kensington Avenue, Buffalo, NY 14214

2. Familiarize yourself with Article XXII of the Erie County Sanitary Code.

3. Pass a test, which will be administered by the ECDOH, on code requirements and hygienic practices.

4. Be aware that most tattoo shop operators will require you to perform an apprenticeship period before they will allow you to conduct tattooing in their shop. This is not required by the ECDOH, but is up to the discretion of the shop operator.

Helpful Resources

Tuberculosis (TB) Control Program

Did you attend the ECDOH TB Clinic? If yes, please complete out patient survey! Click here!

608 William Street
Buffalo, NY 14206
716-858-7687  

The Tuberculosis Control program provides evaluation and treatment for all active tuberculosis cases, and follow-up evaluation and testing for their contacts. The program provides preventive treatment for positive tuberculin reactors when required. Tuberculin testing and/or chest x-rays are also available. TB skin testing is available on a walk in basis but all other services by appointment only. Please call 858-7687 to schedule your appointment.

 

Vector Information (rodents, mosquitoes, ticks, etc)

503 Kensington Avenue
Buffalo, NY 14214
Phone: (716) 961-6800
Fax: (716) 961-6880
Areas Served: All areas in Erie County, NY
For Emergencies after regular business hours: 716- 961-7898
Printable Map (PDF)

           

What is a Vector?

A vector is an organism that does not cause disease itself but that transmits infection by conveying pathogens from one host to another, serving as a route of transmission.

WNY Stress Reduction Program

WNY Stress Reduction Program Link