Protection from Mosquito-Borne Diseases; Drought Conditions Contribute to Stagnant Water in Storm Sewer Receivers

Modified: July 12, 2016 2:35pm

07/12/2016

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PRESS RELEASE

From the Office of the Commissioner of Health, Dr. Gale R. Burstein

Date July 12, 2016                           

CONTACT: Mary C. St. Mary/Mary.StMary@Erie.Gov

Phone: 716.858.4941/ Mobile: 716.253.3925

 

Protection from Mosquito-Borne Diseases 

Drought Conditions Contribute to Stagnant Water in Storm Sewer Receivers

ERIE COUNTY, NY—The Erie County Department of Health (“ECDOH”) reminds residents to remove standing water from their property to eliminate stagnant pools of water where mosquitoes can breed and to properly protect themselves from mosquito bites. Photo

“Although we have not had a confirmed human case of West Nile Virus (“WNV”) in Erie County since October 2012,” said Erie County Health Commissioner Dr. Gale Burstein, “we want to minimize the risk of mosquito-borne diseases.”

Burstein continued: “Mosquitoes are a summertime nuisance, but by taking a few proactive, simple steps, you can reduce your risk of being bitten and possibly contracting a mosquito-borne disease like WNV. “

“The dry conditions this summer have caused the dirty water captured in storm sewer receivers to become stagnant, as there has been insufficient rainwater to routinely flush that standing water away. That standing water serves as a perfect breeding ground for mosquitos. In addition, items that collect rain water on your property, such as house gutters, garden pots, used tires, rain barrels, and children’s pools, are ideal receptacles for breeding,” said Peter Tripi, Senior Public Health Sanitarian.Photo

“We are also concerned with the number of unmaintained and stagnant swimming pools in Erie County, usually at houses that are stuck in the foreclosure process. One neglected and untended swimming pool can infest an entire neighborhood with mosquitoes. Please be good neighbors and eliminate any standing water on your property as it is not only a nuisance, but also a public health threat,” concluded Tripi. 

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For more information:   

Erie County Department of Health

New York State Department of Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention