Eligibility

If your income (based on your family size) is less than or equal to the amounts in the charts below, you may be eligible for SNAP benefits.

  • If your household's gross income is below these amounts, it does not ensure that you will be eligible for a benefit.
  • A SNAP budget must be calculated for your household in order to determine eligiblity and benefit amount.
  • The only way to determine if your household is eligible for SNAP benefits is to apply.

Gross income means a household's total, non-excluded income, before any deductions have been made, such as taxes or other withholdings. Net income means gross income minus allowable deductions.


 Income Guidelines for Households without Earned Income

*Effective October 1, 2019*

(no elderly or disabled member/ 100% of Federal Poverty Line)

Family Size

                     Monthly Gross Income Limit

1

$1,041

2

                                      $1,410

3

$1,778

4

$2,146

5

$2,515

6

$2,883

7

$3,251

8

$3,620

Each additional person

+$369

* Chart information is

based upon SNAP Standards effective Oct. 1, 2019

 

 

 

 


 Income Guidelines for Households with Earned Income

*Effective October 1, 2019*

(no elderly or disabled member/ 150% of Federal Poverty Line)

Family Size

                     Monthly Gross Income Limit

1

$1,562

2

$2,114

3

$2,667

4

$3,219

5

$3,772

6

$4,324

7

$4,877

8

$5,429

Each additional person

+$553

*Chart information is

based upon SNAP Standards effective Oct. 1, 2019

 

 

 

 


 Income Guidelines for Households with an Elderly or Disabled Member and Households with Dependent Care Expenses  (200% of FPL)

*Effective October 1, 2019*

Family Size

                     Monthly Gross Income Limit

1

$2,082

2

$2,818

3

$3,555

4

$4,292

5

$5,028

6

$5,765

7

$6,502

8

$7,238

Each additional person

+$737

*Chart information is

based upon SNAP Standards effective Oct. 1, 2019

 

 

 

 

What if I have savings?

Most households applying for SNAP no longer have to pass a savings/resource test in order to get SNAP benefits. This means that the household's assets (stocks, savings and retirement accounts, etc.) are not considered when determining eligibility.

What if I am a college student?

To participate in SNAP, a student in college or at least half-time must meet the income eligibility for SNAP and one of the following criteria:

  • Be employed for an average of 20 hours per week and be paid for such employment or, if self-employed, be employed for an average of 20 hours per week and receive weekly earnings at least equal to the Federal minimum wage multiplied by 20 hours.
  • Participate in a State or Federally financed work study program during the regular school year.
  • Provide more than half the physical care for one or more dependent household members under the age of six or provide more than half the physical care of dependent household members who have reached the age of six but are under the age of 12 where adequate child care is not available.
  • Enrolled full-time in an institution of higher education and is a single parent with responsibility for the care of a dependent child under age 12.
  • Receive Unemployment Benefits (UIB).