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December 31, 2014                      

 POLONCARZ ANNOUNCES AVAILABILITY OF EMERGENCY ENERGY ASSISTANCE FUNDS  

Enrollment for HEAP Emergency Assistance begins January 2; Apply through EC HEAP Office

ERIE COUNTY, NY— Today, Erie County Executive Mark C. Poloncarz announced that the Erie County Department of Social Services’ (“ECDSS”) 2014-2015 Home Energy Assistance Program (“HEAP”) emergency benefit component will begin on January 2, 2015.  Emergency benefits are available to assist eligible households in resolving heating, heat-related electric and energy-related temporary housing emergencies.  

Emergencies that qualify for benefits include: 

•          The applicant’s natural gas or electric service for heat or heat-related electric service is terminated    or scheduled for termination; or 

•          The applicant has less than ¼ tank of oil, kerosene or propane; or 

•          The applicant has less than a ten-day supply of any other deliverable fuel source; or

•          The applicant is in need of a propane tank deposit to obtain a new propane tank and set up due to their supplier’s termination of their account. 

“HEAP is a federally-funded program to help eligible households in meeting their home energy needs,” said Poloncarz. “The emergency benefit component of this program is very important because it prevents the heat from being shut off on the homes of many low-income families and senior citizens on a fixed income.  I encourage residents who are at risk of having their heat turned off to apply as soon as possible.”  

To be eligible for emergency HEAP assistance, the applicant must be the customer of record, have gross household monthly income at or below the maximum income guidelines, not have available liquid resources greater than $2,000 (or $3,000 if the household contains an individual age 60 or older), and meet all other non-financial requirements.  

Emergency benefit amounts (listed by primary home heating source) are as follows:  

  • Heating emergency benefits: Heat-related electric = $140
  • Oil, kerosene, and propane = $575
  • Wood, wood pellets, corn, coal or other = $500
  • Natural gas heat only = $350
  • Natural gas heat with domestic electric = $490
  • Electric heat = $490
  • Propane tank deposit = up to $500 per program year  

If service is currently off, a member of the household or authorized representative must apply in person at the Erie County HEAP office, located at 478 Main Street, Buffalo.  

Applicants, including TA and SNAP recipients approved for a 2014-15 regular benefit who meet the customer of record requirements, can apply for emergency HEAP benefits by phone by calling (716) 858-7644. 

Applications for emergency HEAP benefits will be accepted through March 16, 2015.  

For more information:  

On the Erie County Department of Social Services, visit   http://www2.erie.gov/socialservices/

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EARLY CHILDHOOD DIRECTION CENTER  

Looking for support? There's help available! Our group is dual-purposed, and serves as both a parent/guardian support group in addition to a child play group. Children with visual impairments ages birth - 5 are who our group primarily serves, however; this group also welcomes children with any developmental delays or disabilities in that age range. We meet once a month to talk about concerns, obstacles, and successes you may be encountering with your child, in addition to allowing free play time for our children. The overall purpose of this group is to provide support and allow for new connections to be fostered among a community of parents, caregivers, and children

 

You can contact ECDC Staff at ECDC@kaleidahealth.org 

telephone 1-800-462-7853

 

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Creating a Sensory Friendly Home Environment for Children on the Autism Spectrum - National Autism Network

 http://nationalautismnetwork.com 

Individuals with autism often experience sensory difficulties that can make everyday interaction painstaking. Noises that typically go without notice to the general public can be a huge challenge for an individual with autism, and prevent them from being able to focus on a given task or possibly even lead to a meltdown.  

Although not considered core features of autism, sensory issues, which can impact all 5 senses, have been found to affect nearly 90 percent of children on the spectrum in some way or another. While it is impossible to control others out in public, there are steps you can take as parents to make your home more sensory-friendly for your child. A child's sensory needs could involve the reduction of stimuli or an increase of stimulation depending on the situation.2 This article will discuss features you can add in your home to make it more comfortable for your child experiencing sensory sensitivities.  

Children with autism have sensory needs that may be viewed as odd to the layman individual unfamiliar with the disorder. Actions like lining objects in a row or stimming can seem peculiar, but may offer therapeutic value for that individual. Below are some examples of household features that can assist these sensory needs as well as items that can transform your home into a living space that is more sensory friendly:  

Design: When planning a sensory-friendly environment it is important to envision how the design or the layout of the area will affect the child's abilities. You are going to want to design a room to be sensory-friendly by constructing it so that it cuts down on outside stimuli, is organized (and can be easily reorganized).  Plan as much out in the design phase as possible including furniture arrangement, color schemes, child's needs, how much sunlight is getting in, the type of theme you desire, if any, outlet placement, what your budget is, the types of sensory devices/activities you would like to include, etc.   This is most important in rooms in where your child spends the majority of their time, such as their room, the living room, kitchen, and bathroom.   

Color: Colors have the power to incite specific emotions and feelings inside of us. For example, red, which triggers stimulation, appetite, and hunger, and yellow, which triggers feelings of happiness and friendliness, are often used by fast food companies to get you to subconsciously desire their food. 

When it comes to colors for children on the autism spectrum, less is more, as some research has found that children with autism see color more intensely than their neurotypical peers.  

One of the cornerstones of making a room sensory-friendly is to cut down on overstimulation. To stay true to this concept, colors should be low-toned, or muted, patterns should be minimal, and colors should be chosen wisely. For example, blue has been found to be the most calming, while reds were found to be the most arousing in children with autism. No matter how you plan your room's colors, you can always add sensory stimuli to them according to your child's needs.  

Lighting: This is where you get to really be creative, especially for your child's room. A calming environment will naturally be void of intense lighting from fluorescent bulbs, but in their place a number of different lighting techniques can be used. Bright or fluorescent lights can be disorienting for those on the spectrum, causing them to seek refuge or isolate themselves in a more controlled environment.  Every room in your house should have a dimmer switch so that the lighting can be adjusted according to your child's needs. For your child's room, you can introduce lighting in a variety of ways. Black lights, Christmas lights, bubble tubes, projectors, LED lights, fiber optics, night lights etc. are all viable ways to provide lighting in your child's room.  Putting a piece of fabric safely around a lighting fixture can also reduce light. While there is a consensus within the autism community that fluorescent lighting should be avoided, the jury is still out on natural light. Some argue that natural light aids cognitive abilities and overall health. However, there are others who believe that natural lighting is detrimental to an individual with autism because distractions like glare, shifting sunlight patterns, and outside visual stimuli are too great. However, for a home setting natural light is encouraged, and there is nothing stopping you from drawing a curtain if it becomes too big of a distraction. Blackout curtains can be helpful, especially for children who often experience sleep issues.  

Organization/Structure: Let's face it, kids will be kids, and that means they will be messy. However, keeping rooms structured and organized is important for maintaining routine. Play things do not only need to be organized in a logical manner, but able to be easily accessed by your child whenever he/she pleases. Of the utmost importance is safety. Be sure to arrange furniture and your electronic devices so that there aren't any exposed wiring or outlet holes. Your structure and organization doesn't need to end in your child's room or even have to involve their possessions.  Other organization tips include a toy bin on wheels, a sensory "sweet spot" full of pillows and other sensory-friendly items, simple routines, and anything that will make your child feel more comfortable.  

Furniture: The type of furniture you have in your house can go a long way to providing structure and organization, as well as ensuring your child's safety. Children tend to be rough on furniture, especially their own, so make sure to purchase durable items. In the dining room, cushioned, heavy chairs with long backs provide the most support and security. For children who have poor motor skills, a low-rise table may be suitable to prevent from tipping or falling out of chairs.  

In their room, arrange furniture so your child can easily transition from activity to activity without breaking routine. Also, arrange the furniture in such a way that they are away from shelves or other places where the child may climb. It is also important to keep in mind that doorknobs and hooks can be viewed as invitations for climbing in the eyes of a child who views the entire world as their personal play palace. For children who have the motor skills and the desire, there are sensory room designs that include rock climbing walls.  Labels on the furniture can be helpful at not only assisting a child with identifying an object, but also its purpose. For example, if you label a bed as "for sleeping", then your child will be less likely to use it as a trampoline. Your furniture can take on the same principles of other sensory items, and that is to either calm or stimulate the senses depending on the situation.  

Sensory Items: While it may seem impractical to introduce some of the items you might see at an Occupational Therapy session, such as a ball pit (although, one can be easily created using an empty child's pool and plastic balls) , many of the therapeutic tools utilized during OT can be affordable and easily applied in the home. Big pillows, rope ladders, tactile paths/discs, OT therapy tunnels, swings, and many other variations on these themes are essential for enhancing and calming your child's sensory needs. Your child's mattress is another item that warrants careful consideration as sleeping problems are common for children with autism, not to mention potential bed wetting scenarios. Like the rest of the furniture your child uses, your bed frame should be heavy and durable. Weighted blankets, although not entirely without controversy, have been used by some to help children with autism conquer sleep issues or for the calming effect.   As for the mattress itself, you want it to be firm, soft, and durable, which is why memory foam or latex mattresses work best, but take your child to the store for a test drive, if possible. For themed rooms, your child's bed frame can make bedtime feel like more of an adventure than a chore. Some families have installed curtain rods in the ceiling above the bed so the child can block out excess light and have more privacy.  

Shelves: This may seem like a small feature to be given its own section, but shelf placement and use can help keep your child engaged. First of all, arrange shelves horizontally as to suppress any notion of climbing. Secondly, children with autism tend have a proclivity for lining things up or stacking items (the latter of which can come in handy when deciding upon organizational tactics). According to The Sensory Hippo, which provides idea for sensory living, "creating a play space in your home that appeals to their desire to line things up can be calming for them."  

These long shelves should be placed just below eye level and be installed in multiple rooms in the house.  These shelves can be therapeutic as a calming strategy, but can also work as a new coping strategy. For example, if a child with autism isolates themselves when strangers come over, then you can give them a new toy or special item they find comforting for them to line up and play with in the living room or family room. The new coping strategy can work to help get them through the visit as opposed to running into their room. 

Bathroom: The bathroom is likely anything but a haven for your child on the autism spectrum. The bathroom can cause a number of sensory sensitivities such as the ringing of echoes on tile surfaces, cold floors, hard/cold toilet seats, loud toilets, running water, and bright lights reflected on mirrors can all be disorienting for individuals on the spectrum. 

The first thing you should consider when trying to make your bathroom more sensory-friendly is safety. Some safety issues to install would be a bath rail and a rail next to the toilet, a toilet lock, non-slip surfaces on tiles and in the tub, non-slip stools, etc.  In terms of comfort, non-slip rugs and mats next to the tub and sink, cushioned potty cover, shelves and hooks for towels to decrease the echoes in the room, night lights over bright lights (natural lighting during the day if possible), and a towel warmer to cut down on the anxiety shivering can cause children. Other features you may want to consider is a removable, handheld shower head, a shower head with LED lights, portable bath jets that can reduce pain and induce relaxation through massage, a waterproof pillow, bath toys (naturally), music in the bathroom, and be sure to utilize non-toxic cleaners. Glass mirrors frequently used by your child should be replaced with a reflective acrylic surface to avoid breaking. 

Conclusion  

There are infinite possibilities out there when it comes to constructing a more sensory-friendly environment in your home that cover a wide range of expenses. You do not have to break the bank to create an effective sensory-friendly environment and some sensory items you can even create myself. Include your child in the planning, decision making, and creation process as much as possible. Tailor their sensory-friendly environments to their favorite subjects because after all they will be spending a lot of time there. Have fun with the process and remember it doesn't have to be perfect.  

We would love to hear about some sensory activities or objects you have installed in your home in the comment section below. We have also included some resources relating to sensory-friendly environments below

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The National Preparedness Community  

 

Looking for a change in 2015?  

Here is one New Year's resolution that is easy to keep: learn more about what you can do to help prepare you and your family for emergencies.  

Don't know where to start? Visit Ready.gov to learn what protective measures to take before, during, and after an emergency.

 Interested in stepping up your preparedness game? The 2015 Seasonal Preparedness Messaging Calendar will guide you through the coming months and let you know what resources will be coming your way. Resolve to be Ready in 2015.

 With the start of the new year, it doesn't hurt to get back to basics and review some of the essential items that you should have in your house and as a part of your preparedness plan. One of the most important pieces you should maintain is a basic emergency supply kit.
Your kit could include the following recommended items:

  • One gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

Visit Ready.gov for more information about how to build your basic emergency supply kit. Also, be sure to share what is in your supply kit and how it has helped you! 

We're always on the look out for members and organizations to feature in our weekly newsletter. From highlighting your accomplishments in preparedness and emergency management, to members just looking for advice and input, we want to hear from you! 

Want to be featured in our Member Spotlight? Submit your story here! 

Have something else you'd like to see featured in our weekly newsletter? Fill out this brief questionnaire.

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The Learning Center (TLC) has open spots for Adult Education classes for adults with a learning disability. TLC provides individualized educational instruction to adults who do not have a high school diploma. TLC offers small group instruction to those interested in obtaining their GED, as well as classes to improve basic literacy in reading, writing and math. For more information, contact the Learning Disabilities Association of WNY by emailing information@ldaofwny.org or calling (716) 874-7200.
Thank you!
 

Parrish Gibbons

Director of Community Relations

Learning Disabilities Association of WNY

O: 716-874-7200

F: 716-874-7205

C: 716-390-9435

Explore LDA of WNY online! www.ldaofwny.org, Facebook, Twitter or Vimeo!

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Family Support Services

Family Support Services Coordinators are available at each of OPWDD's Developmental Disabilities Regional Offices (DDROs) to help families access Family Support Services. Each DDRO also has a Family Support Services Advisory Council to represent the interests of family members and people with developmental disabilities. The councils work in partnership with the DDROs to make decisions supporting families and loved ones.

Family Support Services can help in times of crisis when a family member or loved one becomes ill, or when things get difficult at home for other reasons. With assistance and support, families can often work these situations out and stay together. Find out more information about these services and supports by calling the Family Support Services Coordinator at the DDRO representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

DDROs continually work with local community agencies to ensure that other family support services for people with developmental disabilities and their loved ones are available when and where they are needed. These family support services may include:

  • information and referral
  • family and individual counseling
  • family-member training
  • recreation
  • camps (Adult Overnight Summer Camp Information )
  • after-school programs
  • transportation
  • sibling services
  • support groups
  • service coordination

DDROs can also arrange for specialized equipment and home modifications.  For information about these types of FSS supports and services, please contact the Family Support Services Coordinators Listing of the Developmental Disabilities Regional Office (DDRO) representing the county in which the individual/family lives.

 Wishing YOU a Happy and Healthy Holiday!

Vickie Rubin, M.S. Ed.  Phone - 716-880-3880 

Early Childhood Direction Center
3131 SHERIDAN DRIVE, People Inc Building
AMHERST, NEW YORK 14226
(PEOPLE INC. BUILDING)
The only acceptable R-word is “respect”. 

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BORNHAVA MEN’S FORUM

The men’s forum is open to fathers and male caregivers of children with special needs.   The forum meets in the evening once a month throughout the school calendar year at Bornhava, 25 Chateau Terrace, Amherst, New York.  

The group has been meeting monthly for several years.  Approximately twelve fathers have participated in the group, with an average attendance of seven or eight men, fathers of birth to five year olds.  It has been a great success.  There are ongoing discussions about coping with the handicapping conditions – the stresses, challenges, and rewards of being a father/male caregiver of a child with special needs.  There are also many practical discussions about what people are doing for their kids and how to access additional services. 

The group is facilitated by a licensed psychologist, Donald Crawford, PhD. 

Contact:    Ellen Crawford @ 839-1655  

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 The TRAID-In Equipment Exchange Program is a statewide service that connects individuals with disabilities, searching for an affordable means to acquire needed devices, with people who have devices they wish to sell or donate. Call the NYS Commission on Quality of Care and Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities at 800-624-4143 or email at webmaster@cqcapd.state.ny.us and ask for the TRAID-IN Equipment Exchange Program to list, at no cost, devices being sought or devices that are available. 

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STARLIGHT STUDIO GIFT STORE-click on websitehttp://www.cafepress.com/starlightstudiogiftstore

 
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SAVE THE DATES:   
 
 

 

The next Connected Parents meeting will be on Thursday, January 29th at 7pm at the Blue Fire Grill inside the Marriott at 1340 Millersport Highway, Amherst. We meet the last Thursday of every month at the same time and place. 

 

Connected Parents is a support group for parents and caregivers of individuals with cerebral palsy. It was created by parents for parents as a way to connect and share information and resources. If you're looking for a night out, some good food, and some good conversation, come on out and join us! 

 

Hope to see you then! 

 

-Stephanie Collier

 

Stay connected with us on Facebook at facebook.com/ConnectedParents.

The Keeping You Informed section of Kaleida Health`s website features a wealth of information, stories and pictures about our valued workforce and the tremendous momentum our organization is experiencing. Check us out at: www.kaleidahealth.org/kyi

 

 

 

 

 

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 Parent Network of WNY presents 

Front Door & Self-Directed Services 

In this workshop individuals, families and caregivers will learn what OPWDD funded self-directed services are and how they work. Participants develop a basic understanding of creating an initial service plan for the individual with a developmental disability, identify what their responsibilities will be and who they will be working with during this process. Learn what the terms employer and budget authority and the roles of the start-up broker, support broker and more will play in Self-Directed Services. 

Tuesday, January 27, 2015 

5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m. 

Developmental Disabilities Regional Office 

1200 East and West Road 

West Seneca, NY 14224 

Call to reserve your spot today!! 

(716) 332-4170 phone; 1-866-277-4762 toll free  

www.parentnetworkwny.org  

Check your local TV broadcasts for cancellation information.

Sponsored and funded by PARENT NETWORK OF WNY & OPWDD

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BELMONT HOUSING RESOURCES FOR WNY

FREE Financial Education Workshop Series! 

Main Street Office

1195 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209

5:30 PM—7:30 PM 

Tuesday, February 3 —Take Charge

Come learn about the basics of creating a spending plan and financial organization.

 

 Thursday, February 5To Your Credit  

We will discuss the basics of credit, credit reports, and how to deal with debt collectors. 

The financial series is provided free of charge thanks to funding provided by:

United Way of WNY & US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development 

Refreshments provided! 

Tuesday, February 10— Financial Scams  

Come learn about identity theft, and current financial scams that may affect you and your family!

 

Thursday, February 12 —Planning for the Future  

Learn the steps to creating SMART goals and planning for your future! 

Space is limited so register today!

Online Registration! Available 24/7!

http://www.belmonthousingwny.org/financial__education_workshops/

Or register by phone:

Melody @ 884-7791 ext. 105

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University at Buffalo Civic Engagement Fair

February 4, 2015 -- From 9:00am-3:00pm

In an attempt to further promote the importance of

Civic Engagement within our community the Honors

College is hosting its First Annual Civic Engagement

Fair on February 4th, 2015. 

Schedule of Fair Events:

9:00am – Community Partner Registration  

9:30am - Breakfast for Community Partners

10:00am – Event Set-Up

11:00am – Civic Engagement Fair Begins 

2:00pm – Civic Engagement Fair Ends 

2:30pm– Wrap-Up & Event Take Down 

*Please note that Community Partner Attendance is not mandatory for the entire duration of the Civic

Engagement Fair. 

Parking:

Free on-campus parking will be provided to participating Community Partners on the day

of the event.

Absentee Tables:

Tables may still be provided for Community Partners that are unable to attend the Civic Engagement Fair in person. Should your

organization still wish to participate, you may send any informational, promotional, or contact materials to the UB Honors College in advance.

If you have any additional questions or comments pertaining to the Civic Engagement Fair please contact the UB Honors College

at (honors@buffalo.edu) or via phone at (716-645-3020). 

University at Buffalo Civic Engagement Fair

Registration is open until January 30, 2015!

You can register to participate in the Fair by contacting the UB Honors College via email at (honors@buffalo.edu) or

via phone at (716-645-3020). 

February 4, 2015 | From 9:00am – 3:00pm

Located on UB North Campus in Capen Hall

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Parent Network of WNY and The Western New York Institute

Benefits for Persons with Developmental Disabilities in New York State

Learn about benefits available for persons with developmental disabilities in New York State.

This workshop focuses on SSI, SSD, Medicaid and Medicare, as well as general information regarding

Special Needs Trusts.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Parent Network

1000 Main Street

Buffalo, NY 14202

Call to reserve your spot today!!

(716) 332-4170 phone; 1-866-277-4762 toll free

www.parentnetworkwny.org

Check your local TV broadcasts for cancellation information.

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Parent Network of WNY and Parenting Today

Toileting

Feel like you have tried everything?

Are you frustrated with the toilet training process?

For some children toilet training is a challenge. Toilet training children with special needs may pose difficulty for the child and parents. This difficultly can be eased with the knowledge of a variety of techniques and strategies effective in toilet training. This training is meant to help reinforce persistence and provide hope that this challenge can be meet with success.

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Parent Network

1000 Main Street

Buffalo, NY 14202

Call to reserve your spot today!!

(716) 332-4170

phone; 1-866-277-4762

toll free 

www.parentnetworkwny.org

Check your local TV broadcasts for cancellation information.

Workshop Sponsored and Funded by:  PARENT NETWORK OF WNY

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Front Door & Self-Directed Services

In this workshop individuals, families and caregivers will learn what OPWDD funded self-directed services are and how they work. Participants develop a basic understanding of creating an initial service plan for the individual with a developmental disability, identify what their responsibilities will be and who they will be working with during this process. Learn what the terms employer and budget authority and the roles of the start-up broker, support broker and more will play in Self-Directed Services.

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

5:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Developmental Disabilities Regional Office

1200 East and West Road

West Seneca, NY 14224

Call to reserve your spot today!!

(716) 332-4170

phone; 1-866-277-4762

toll free 

www.parentnetworkwny.org

Check your local TV broadcasts for cancellation information.

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BELMONT

HOUSING RESOURCES FOR WNY

FREE FINANCIAL EDUCATION WORKSHOP SERIES   

Main Street Office 

1195 Main Street, Buffalo, NY 14209

5:30 PM—7:30 PM 

Tuesday, February 3 —Take Charge 

Come learn about the basics of creating a spending plan and financial organization.  

Thursday, February 5  

To Your Credit   

We will discuss the basics of credit, credit reports, and how to deal with debt collectors.  

The financial series is provided free of charge thanks to funding provided by: 

The United Way of Buffalo and Erie County

&

The U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development 

Refreshments provided!  

Tuesday, February 10  

Financial Scams  

 

Come learn about identity theft, and current financial scams that may affect you and your family!  

Thursday, February 12 —Planning for the Future   

Learn the steps to creating SMART goals and 

planning for your future!  

Space is limited so register today! 

Online Registration! Available 24/7! 

http://www.belmonthousingwny.org/financial__education_workshops/  

Or register by phone: 

Melody @ 884-7791 ext. 105

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“  Using Music in Your Classroom So That Your Students ‘Stay in Tune’ Throughout the Day ”

…Solving the Mysteries of Serving Young Children with Developmental Disabilities in Child Care Community Settings 

This FREE workshop is designed for community childcare staff, parents and other service providers working with young children. 

* Explore a variety of ways that students and teachers can experience music

* Learn strategies to integrate music into your classroom

* Discover the “hidden” benefits of music that promote educational concepts, positive social interactions, motor skill development, social/emotional development and language/communication

* Be informed of the advantages of group vs. individual music sessions                                     

* Understand the difference between Music Education and Music Therapy

* Find out how music therapy is beneficial to not only children with special needs, but for all children- all for the same reasons

 This workshop will involve demonstrations, audience participation and video clips that will inspire you to use music within  your classroom for positive results! 

***This workshop meets the OCFS training requirements of: Principles of Childhood Development, Child Day Care Program Development 

          WHEN:     February 5, 2015

                          7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

        WHERE:     Temple Beth Zion Play and Learn School

                           700 Sweet Home Road

                           Amherst, New York 14226 

GUEST SPEAKER:

  Corie Barkey, Music Therapist, Baker Victory Early Childhood Program 

A question and answer session will follow the presentation. 

This FREE workshop is made possible by the collaboration between the Early Childhood Inclusion Committee of the Developmental Disabilities Alliance of WNY, and theEarlyChildhoodDirectionCenter.

   To register for the workshop or for more information, please call: 

Early Childhood Direction Center     819-2408         OR     Kathy Coe    880-3875                                                                or email ecdc@kaleidahealth.org   Erie County Medical Center  
When registering, please give your name and phone number and number of attendees in case we need to contact you.                                                           

Each center attending will receive a FREE copy of “Working with Young Children with Special Needs:

A Resource Directory”, a guide to the systems and service linkages available in our community.

Please feel free to duplicate this announcement for distribution to parents and staff. 

This training is made possible through funding from the Developmental Disabilities Alliance of Western New York (DDAWNY) and Kaleida Health

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  Parent Network of WNY and The Western New York Institute presents:

Benefits for Persons with

Developmental Disabilities in New York State

Learn about benefits available

for persons with developmental disabilities in New York State.

This workshop focuses on SSI, SSD, Medicaid and Medicare, as well as general information regarding

Special Needs Trusts.

Thursday, February 5, 2015

9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Parent Network

1000 Main Street

Buffalo, NY 14202

Call to reserve your spot today!!

(716) 332-4170

phone; 1-866-277-4762

toll free 

www.parentnetworkwny.org

Check your local TV broadcasts for cancellation information.

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Give Kids A Smile Day

University at Buffalo

School of Dental Medicine – Squire Hall

Give Kids a Smile is a ONE

DAY national event where

children without dental

insurance are able to receive

FREE dental services!

Services Offered:

Dental Exams

Cleanings

Fluoride treatment

Fillings

X-Rays (if needed)

Sealants

Extractions

Orthodontic Consultation

For more information and to schedule an appointment for

your child please contact: (716) 861-3593 or (716) 829-3717

UB Smile Team

Friday, February 6th, 2015 

8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m 

For Children Ages 1 – 18, Who Do Not Have Access to Dental Care

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  Parent Network of WNY and

Parenting Today  

Toileting 

Feel like you have tried everything? 

Are you frustrated with thetoilet training process?  

For some children toilet training is a challenge. Toilet training children with special needs may pose difficulty for the child and parents. This difficultly can be eased with the knowledge of a variety of techniques and strategies effective in toilet training. This training is meant to help reinforce persistence and provide hope that this challenge can be meet with success. 

Tuesday, February 10, 2015

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Parent Network

1000 Main Street

Buffalo, NY 14202

Call to reserve your spot today!!

(716) 332-4170

phone; 1-866-277-4762 toll free 

www.parentnetworkwny.org

 

Check your local TV broadcasts for cancellation information.

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BUFFALO URBAN LEAGUE PRESENTS:

PROJECT READY MENTOR

MENTOR TRAINING PROVIDED BY:  YOUTH WITH A PURPOSE

Help empower our youth ages 14-18.  Be a positive role model and have fun doing it!

   Mentor's Requirements:

 

One school year commitment

Meeting with your youth at least 3 hrs. face-to-face a month

Some form of communication with your youth every week

Attending mentor trainings

A Required background check

Participate in bi-annual mentor gathering                             

      Contact: Ms. Kristy Tyson, Class Room Facilitator and Case Worker, Ktyson@BuffaloUrbanLeague.org , 716-645-1926   

Up-Coming Project Ready Mentor Event:

 Homicide Education & Prevention Project Workshop, Thursday, February 12, 4-6pm @ 555 Ellicott St., Buffalo, NY  14203 (Room 200B) 

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Developmental Disabilities Awareness Day

Artwork Logo Contest 

Artwork is now being accepted for the 2015 Developmental Disabilities Awareness Day Logo Contest. Artwork may be submitted by any individual with a developmental disability. The winning design will be used on tee shirts, souvenirs, programs, publications, etc.  

GRAND PRIZE: $100

The winner and the finalists will be notified in February 2015 that their piece was chosen. Each winning artist will be invited to attend the DDDay Award Luncheon on May 28th 2015, where they will be recognized on stage and certificates will be given. The winner and the finalists' artwork will also be displayed in the Art Exhibit Gallery. 

PLEASE NOTE: All artwork MUST be original drawings. The original artwork can be a symbol of the conference experience, or it can simply be an abstract concept, flowers, people or something that you find interesting. 

REQUIREMENTS: Black and white drawings OR up to four colors will be accepted. They should be done on white or light-colored paper. Entries should be no larger than 8.5" X 11. Please do not submit any framed or canvas artwork. 

IMPORTANT NOTE:   All entries MUST have artist's name, agency, address, and contact person's name, phone number, and e-mail address on the back of each piece of artwork entered. Entries will not be returned and will become property of the planning committee. Entering artwork in this contest gives the planning committee CONSENTto use the artwork and name for publications, display, publicity or general use. 

Bring or mail all artwork to:

Amy Holdnack,

Aspire of WNY,

7 Community Drive

Cheektowaga, NY 14225 

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION:

February 27th, 2015 by 5 pm. (Sorry no exceptions). 

 

Rick Banner and Rebecca Popiel

Committee Co-Chairs

Western New York Developmental Disabilities Awareness Day

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Developmental Disabilities Awareness Day

Call for Performers 2015 

“LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION” 

Lend your talent on May 28, 2015!

Attention Performers! Developmental Disabilities Awareness Day offers an opportunity for people with developmental disabilities to showcase their unique talents. All performances are held in The Niagara Falls Conference & Event Center Cataract Room throughout the day. The DD Day Entertainment Committee is looking for individuals and groups of individuals who would like to perform. These can include the following: 

Singers ** Singing Groups ** Instrumentalists

Dramatic Groups ** Dancers/ Dance Groups

Comedians ** DramaticReadings*** ETC… 

To accommodate all performers scheduled, performances should be no longer than 15 minutes in length.

An upright piano is available for use at the performance site. Each group should plan on bringing its own instruments, equipment, music, CD player, etc. 

For more information and to request a Call for Performers Information Sheet: 

          Email: mcentner@autism-services-inc.org or call Monica Centner at (716) 631-5777 extension 397

Deadline: March 15, 2015

Notification: Submission of the Call for Performers Information Sheet does not guarantee a performance opportunity In mid April, performers will be notified and given the time of their performance. (Time slots are between the hours of 8am-9:15am, 10:15am-12pm and from 1:30pm-3:15pm)

Have Questions? Call Monica Centner at (716) 631-5777 extension 397

or email:  mcentner@autism-services-inc.org ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

The Rotary Club of Lewiston/ Niagara on the Lake is sponsoring: 

Pints! Pierogis! Placek!

Fundraiser for The Autism Center at Women's and Children's Hospital of Buffalo

March 28, 2015, 5:00pm - 9:30pm

At: Gadowski's Restaurant

1445 Falls Street, Niagara Falls, New York 14303

Adult:  $25.00            Children:  $15.00 

The adult donation includes, one pint of micro-brew beer, six homemade pierogis samples of fresh, homemade placek, one ticket for raffle(door prize), and music. The child's donation excludes beer. 

Pre- sale tickets includes an extra pint of micro-brew beer. 

For more information on donating or purchasing tickets to this great event:

 Ron Danielewicz at 716-870-1307